Ricoh And Kyushu University Jointly Develop A Thin, Light, Bendable Organic Photovoltaic (OPV)

The jointly-developed flexible energy harvesting device
Spread the love

Thin, light, and bendable Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) is suitable for indoor and semi-outdoor environments.

The demand for the Internet of Things (IoT) is on the rise throughout society. Now, Ricoh Asia Pacific Pte Ltd.’s flexible energy harvesting device efficiently generates power indoors or in shaded areas as a stand-alone power source for the constant operation of a variety of sensors. In September, Ricoh will start sample shipments of these devices.

Advertisments

The flexible energy harvesting device, sized 41mm by 47mm, uses a unique power generation organic photovoltaic (OPV) material developed jointly from 2013 in an industry-academia collaboration with Kyushu University. The result is efficient power generation in low-light environment, such as indoors (approximately 200 lx), and medium-light such as shaded outdoor areas (approximately 10,000 lx). In addition, the thin, lightweight, and bendable film can be mounted on IoT devices of various shapes.

These devices can be used as stand-alone power sources for mobile and portable wearable terminals, beacons, and is ideal for social infrastructure monitoring devices, such as ones installed in tunnels and under bridges. This will make it unnecessary to replace batteries in a wide variety of small consumer electronic devices, which is expected to improve convenience and contribute to the Sustainable Development Goal “Affordable and Clean Energy”. Since the release of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) for indoor use in 2020, Ricoh aims to expand its product lineup as soon as possible by providing samples to IoT device manufacturers, service providers, and trading companies as the next environmental power generation device.

Kyushu University and Ricoh will continue to collaborate on research and development* to achieve even higher output and durability.

* This research and development have been supported by JST’s “Adaptable and Seamless Technology transfer Program through target-driven R&D (A-STEP)” “Functional Innovation and Practical Technology Development of Organic Energy Harvesting Devices.”

Example of the connection to a flexible power supply board. Photo credit: Ricoh
Image of a world without recharging and with flexible eco-powered devices.
Image of a world without recharging and with flexible eco-powered devices. Photo credit: Ricoh.

“Energy harvesting is a future-oriented energy technology that supports our future IoT society through advanced use of environmental ‘ambient light’,” says professor Takuma Yasuda, Inamori Frontier Research Center, Kyushu University.

“The developed organic materials differ from conventional solar cell materials in that they exhibit excellent power generation performance even in indoor environments. The devices using these organic materials are as thin, light as paper, can be bent, and can generate power anytime and anywhere, even under dim-light conditions. This new energy technology is also expected to be widely implemented as a distributed and independent power source for various small electronic devices around us,” professor Takuma Yasuda added.

“Our future is to create ‘A World Without Charging’,” says Tetsuya Tanaka, general manager, EH Business Center, RICOH Futures BU. “We hope to realize a world where people do not have to consciously recharge or replace their batteries.”

-End-

 

CLICK HERE FOR LATEST NEWS.

READ CURRENT AND PAST ISSUES OF IAA.

KEEP YOURSELF UPDATED, SUBSCRIBE TO IAA NOW!

AND DON’T FORGET FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, LINKEDIN AND TWITTER!

 

SEMICON Southeast Asia 2021- Highlights From Minister Gan Kim Yong’s Speech
How Digital Transformation Drives Sustainability: The Last Lane On The Road To Industrial Carbon Neutrality